3D: Double Vision

blog.jpg

Now at LACMA (Los Angeles Contemporary Museum of Art) is a special exhibit taking you back to the 175-year history of 3D. 3D: Double Vision explores the quest for perfect 3D representation- how it has driven innovation, stimulated creative expression and sparked wonder in generations to come.  

The underlying principle of 3D media is a human binocular vision: to perceive and locate an object in the world, our brains fuse images received by each of our two eyes into a single, volumetric form. The exhibit delivers images to the eyes using mirrors, lenses or polarized or colored filters and your self-conscious perceptual response to complete the illusion.

Seeing in 3D offers metaphors for understanding ourselves and our history. The eyes receive two images and the mind perceives a singular world. And we have the capacity to translate multiple points of view and appreciate the existence of difference in unity. 

My favorite part of the exhibit is all the vintage advertising for 3D glasses at the entrance of the gallery. 

In the 1830s Charles Wheatstone invented the "stereoscope" to demonstrate that two slightly dissimilar diagrams can be resolved by the eyes and brain into a single volumetric image that does not correspond to a physical object in the world.

In the 1830s Charles Wheatstone invented the "stereoscope" to demonstrate that two slightly dissimilar diagrams can be resolved by the eyes and brain into a single volumetric image that does not correspond to a physical object in the world.

Lygia Clark,  Dialogue: Googles  1968/2014

Lygia Clark, Dialogue: Googles 1968/2014

Robert Breer,  3D Mutoscope  1978

Robert Breer, 3D Mutoscope 1978

Man Ray,  Perpetual Motif  1971

Man Ray, Perpetual Motif 1971

 

 

TechMarina Murad