Tom Wesselmann

Tom Wesselmann,  Still Life #29 , 1963, oil and collage on canvas, 108 × 144 inches

Tom Wesselmann, Still Life #29, 1963, oil and collage on canvas, 108 × 144 inches

One of the benefits of living in Los Angeles is being walking distance to the world's most dominate galleries in the global art-fair circuit: The Gagosian gallery in Beverly Hills. By subscribing to their newsletter, I get invites to attend the opening: an invite to see the art and to people watch: from the wannabe-gallerinas, the Andy Warhol copy cats, the Beverly Hills plastics, the supermodels, and the art collectors—it's definitely a scene to be seen. But like most of us....ehem ehem....we actually care about the art 😉ok and people-watching.

The use of the benday dots technique was very common in the printing process and was used in paintings to create an optical illusion and or texture. This was very popular during the Pop Art movement and was used by artists like Roy Lichtenstein.

The use of the benday dots technique was very common in the printing process and was used in paintings to create an optical illusion and or texture. This was very popular during the Pop Art movement and was used by artists like Roy Lichtenstein.

The monumental paintings are something of awe. Some of Wesselmann's paintings are cut out the canvas on wood to create depth and a relationship of space between the objects and its viewers.

Tom Wesselmann,  Still Life #61 , 1976, oil on shaped canvases, in 4 parts, overall: 8 feet 8 1/2 inches × 32 feet 7 inches × 6 feet 7 inches

Tom Wesselmann, Still Life #61, 1976, oil on shaped canvases, in 4 parts, overall: 8 feet 8 1/2 inches × 32 feet 7 inches × 6 feet 7 inches

Tom Wesselmann,  Still Life #61 , 1976, oil on shaped canvases, in 4 parts, overall: 8 feet 8 1/2 inches × 32 feet 7 inches × 6 feet 7 inches

Tom Wesselmann, Still Life #61, 1976, oil on shaped canvases, in 4 parts, overall: 8 feet 8 1/2 inches × 32 feet 7 inches × 6 feet 7 inches

Tom Wesselmann,  Still Life with Blue Jar and Smoking Cigarette , 1981, oil on shaped canvas, in 4 parts, overall: 9 feet × 18 feet 5 inches × 5 feet 6 inches

Tom Wesselmann, Still Life with Blue Jar and Smoking Cigarette, 1981, oil on shaped canvas, in 4 parts, overall: 9 feet × 18 feet 5 inches × 5 feet 6 inches

Wesselmann's still-life large-scale collages and assemblages are humorous and point out how he made an aesthetic use of everyday objects and not a criticism of them as consumer objects. He didn't like labels and in particular disliked his art to be labeled as 'Pop Art,' especially because it overemphasizes the material used. The exhibit is open until August 24. 

ArtMarina Murad